2007 Chevy Brake Rotor and Pad replacement help? - Chevrolet Forum - Chevy Enthusiasts Forums

2007 Chevy Brake Rotor and Pad replacement help?


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  #1  
Old  June 21st, 2010, 8:49 PM
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2007 Chevy Brake Rotor and Pad replacement help?

I have a 2007 Chevy Tahoe, LTZ 4X4 31000 miles that possibly may be in need of front and rear brake rotors and Pads. Just noticed it this week, but when you turn right or turn the wheel ever so slightly, I get a brake indicator type squeak coming form the driver side wheel. I have done a few brake jobs but not on the Tahoe as of yet. Does anyone have a PDF file or something similiar or a "HOW TO" section for this type of job as I would prefer to do this job myself. I have looked and have not found anything like a HOW TO section here. Any help would be great

  #2  
Old  June 21st, 2010, 9:06 PM
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Inspect the fluid level in the brake master cylinder reservoir.
If the fluid level is midway between the maximum-full point and the minimum allowable level, no fluid needs to be removed from the reservoir before proceeding.
If the fluid level is higher than midway between the maximum-full point and the minimum allowable level, remove fluid to the midway point before proceeding.
Raise and support the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle.
Remove the tire and wheel assembly. Refer to Tire and Wheel Removal and Installation.
Compress the brake caliper pistons.
Install 2 large C-clamps over the top of the caliper housing and against the back of the outboard pad.
Slowly tighten the C-clamps until the pistons are pushed completely into the caliper bores.
Remove the C-clamps from the caliper.
Important:
DO NOT use any air tools to remove the guide pin bolts. Use hand tools ONLY.
Install an open end wrench to hold the caliper guide pin in line with the brake caliper while removing or installing the caliper guide pin bolt. DO NOT allow the open end wrench to come in contact with the brake caliper. Allowing the open end wrench to come in contact with the brake caliper will cause a pulsation when the brakes are applied.
Using an open end wrench to hold the guide pin, loosen the brake caliper guide pin bolt.
Remove the lower brake caliper guide pin bolt (1). Notice: Support the brake caliper with heavy mechanic wire, or equivalent, whenever it is separated from its mount and the hydraulic flexible brake hose is still connected. Failure to support the caliper in this manner will cause the flexible brake hose to bear the weight of the caliper, which may cause damage to the brake hose and in turn may cause a brake fluid leak. Important: DO NOT disconnect the flexible brake hose from the brake caliper.
Rotate the brake caliper (2) upward until it rests on the brake caliper mounting bracket and support with heavy mechanics wire or equivalent. Important: If installing the original brake pads, mark the position of the inner and outer brake pads for proper installation. Remove the brake pads (3). Important:
If installing the original brake pads and shims, mark the position of the shims for the proper installation.
DO NOT reuse the brake pad shims with new brake pads. Replace with NEW only.
Remove the brake pad shims (4) from the mounting bracket (5).

Installation Procedure

Install the shims (4) to the mounting bracket.
Install the NEW shims if replacing the brake pads.
Install the original shims in their original position if installing the original brake pads.
Important: If installing the original brake pads, position the brake pads as marked during the removal procedure. Install the brake pads (3).
Rotate the brake caliper (2) into the proper position on the mounting bracket (5).

Notice: Refer to Fastener Notice.

Important:

DO NOT use any air tools to remove or tighten the guide pin bolts. Use hand tools ONLY.
Install an open end wrench to hold the caliper guide pin in line with the caliper while removing or installing the caliper. DO NOT allow the wrench to come in contact with the brake caliper. Allowing the wrench to come in contact with the brake caliper will cause a pulsation when the brakes are applied.
Use an open end wrench to hold the caliper guide pin while tightening the brake caliper guide pin bolt.

Tighten the bolt to 100 N.m (74 lb ft).

Install the tire and wheel assembly.
Lower the vehicle.
With the engine OFF, gradually apply the brake pedal to approximately 2/3 of its travel distance.
Slowly release the brake pedal.
Wait 15 seconds, then repeat steps 7-8 until a firm pedal is obtained to properly seat the brake caliper pistons and pads.
Fill the brake master cylinder reservoir to the proper level with clean brake fluid, if necessary. Refer to Master Cylinder Reservoir Filling.
Burnish the pads and rotors. Refer to Brake Pad and Rotor Burnishing.

  #3  
Old  June 21st, 2010, 9:13 PM
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My above post is straight from the factory manual. Basically remove the 2 bolts holding the caliper to the bracket. Use a large pair of channel locks or a c-clamp to squeeze the pistons back in. Remove the 2 bolts holding the caliper bracket on then remove the rotor. Clean the hub with a sander, Dremel tool or scrape it with a screwdriver ( the idea is not rust pieces behind the rotor. Pull the slide pins put of the caliper bracket and lube with caliper grease (must be rubber safe). Clean the bracket where the pads sit with brake clean and a brush then put grease there (so the pads slide easily). Then reassemble.

  #4  
Old  June 22nd, 2010, 7:49 AM
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    Austin, Texas
Burnishing

Burnishing Pads and Rotors
provided by Helms GM Service Manual
Caution: Road test a vehicle under safe conditions and while obeying all traffic laws. Do not attempt any maneuvers that could jeopardize vehicle control. Failure to adhere to these precautions could lead to serious personal injury and vehicle damage.

Burnishing the brake pads and brake rotors is necessary in order to ensure that the braking surfaces are properly prepared after service has been performed on the disc brake system.

This procedure should be performed whenever the disc brake rotors have been refinished or replaced, and/or whenever the disc brake pads have been replaced.
1. Select a smooth road with little or no traffic.
2. Accelerate the vehicle to 48 km/h (30 mph).
Important: Use care to avoid overheating the brakes while performing this step.
3. Using moderate to firm pressure, apply the brakes to bring the vehicle to a stop. Do not allow the brakes to lock.
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until approximately 20 stops have been completed. Allow sufficient cooling periods between stops in order to properly burnish the brake pads and rotors.

  #5  
Old  June 22nd, 2010, 9:43 AM
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    Northwest Indiana
THank you very much. I am new to this forum for Chevy. Is there a how to section here. My other vehicle is a VW jetta and I belong to another forum for TDI (turbo Desiel Injection) vehicle. On their forums, the people that know what they are talking about (meaning you guys and not myself) have a "how to" section for the automobile challenged people like myself. Tis would be a great added feature to this site that the both of you would excel at. Thank you for the help, I am going to get the parts in the near future and get started. Thank you again for your hellp with this post.

Mark
2007 LTZ Tahoe
31,000 miles

  #6  
Old  June 22nd, 2010, 10:10 AM
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You should be able to get the pads and rotors fairly inexpensively
1AAuto has them listed for $135 for a set of front rotors and ceramic pads as a set.

looks like the rear set of rotors goes for about $70 less pads...

  #7  
Old  June 22nd, 2010, 8:08 PM
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    KC, MO area
I'd be surprised if you needed pads at 31K even if it's all city driving. I'd check the pads before replacing.

  #8  
Old  June 23rd, 2010, 12:38 PM
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    Northern galactic plane of Andromeda
mctkmt 
I have a 2007 Chevy Tahoe, LTZ 4X4 31000 miles that possibly may be in need of front and rear brake rotors and Pads. Just noticed it this week, but when you turn right or turn the wheel ever so slightly, I get a brake indicator type squeak coming form the driver side wheel.......
I had this same symptom, but it turned out to be a bad wheel right side bearing.

The caliper is cake to remove; 2 bolts and it lifts right out. The caliper frame which must be removed to replace the rotor was another story. Typically, the bolts are rusted tight, and you'll need either pneumatic tools, or a mondo breaker bar. I had nether, and gave up on them until the next pad replacement.

  #9  
Old  December 17th, 2010, 8:30 AM
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brake pad and rotors

I have a 2007 chevy tahoe with 120,000 miles. I just had all brake pads and two front rotors replaced this week at a garage shop. I paid $445.00. Does that sound reasonable? How can i tell if he really replace the rotors?

  #10  
Old  December 17th, 2010, 4:42 PM
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    KC, MO area
Welcome to the forum.

Price sounds about right. New rotors won't be real rusty like ones that are 4-5 years old. You can also measure the thickness. Did you replace them because they were worn out or warped? If they were too thin, then they were probably turned previously.


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